Thursday, December 13, 2007

ANNOUNCING: ZOMBIE GIRL...

...My latest YA written in collaboration with Mel Glenn-- YA poet/novelist who has published
14 titles, most recently SPLIT IMAGE, 2005. (www.melglenn.com)

(As for Flatlanders' Vermont, Chris and I have decided to compile a Flatlander Questionnaire,
print and distribute 500 copies in Feb. 2008. If you're interested in participating in this literary project, send your email address to ebenreilly@aol.com to get your copy!)

ZOMBIE GIRL & the PEARL TATTOO
BY
Eben Reilly
With poems by
Mel Glenn


Zombie Girl: a poetic YA novel set in a locked down facility for teenage girls is haunted by the ghost they call Charlie. Though his identity eludes them, the girls feel Charlie’s presence each time the spectral letters C H A appear, an unseen finger scratching them into the frost on a bedroom window, in the flour on the kitchen counter or in the scouring powder sprinkled in the tub. Always while one of the girl watches: clearly Charlie wants to be known.

But not until an unwitting night guard shows up, the handsome college dropout Dana Drum, who begins a poetry exchange with resident Shannon Larkin, compulsive writer, liar and cutter, does Charlie find a poetic channel into all their lives.

A story of friends coming together in life and from beyond the grave, Zombie Girl, offers mystery and romance through poetry and other out of body experiences.

10 Comments:

At 10:29 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Eileen--

Thanks for the holiday greeting.
And where can we get Zombie Girl?
Tried Amazon...
Happy Hanukah back at you,
Lew and Ellen

 
At 11:22 AM , Anonymous Mel said...

Great summary of the book! Let me know sdif you have a meeting for today with agent. Hope all is well.
Love, Mel

 
At 11:26 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Wanna read it. Is it out yet???

Allysa
(from Rochester reading, remember?)

 
At 11:30 AM , Blogger Eben Reilly said...

Mel--

Thanks, your opinion certainly counts highest. Loved writing the book with you, let's see how our
Zombie Girl fares...

Allysa--
Of course I remember. Haven't done any more workshops in VT since that one-- I'm way down country.
Are you ever in NYC? (And no not yet-- this is more of a pre-publishing announcement-- wish us luck!)

 
At 8:48 AM , Anonymous randi said...

sure looking forward to reading the new book.
at least you get a chance to change to get the gig, i guess with paintings it's just no gig or no sale!
actually going to work on some new paintings. trying to take this next group show seriously.

 
At 9:49 AM , Anonymous Ilana said...

Congrats, Eileen! I look forward to reading and recommending Zombie Girl! You're right, I'm in Vermont, gearing up for the big storm tomorrow. Lots been happening in my life as well; I retired from Brooklyn College on Wednesday; I'm headed to St. Louis next Friday to see my new granddaughter; I'm looking forward to putting my feet up, playing with my puppy and regrouping before figuring out my next steps. Happy holidays to you and yours!
Ilana

 
At 9:56 AM , Blogger Eben Reilly said...

Randi--

It never occurred to me how different it is to submit a ms. to an agent or publisher than to submit a portfolio to a gallery.

You're right-- what if the gallery told you to monkey around w. your painting until it had a look they thought they could sell... hmm, how would you feel about that?

AT the very least compromised.

And would you do it???

 
At 10:47 AM , Anonymous randi said...

So many artists do paint to please the gallery so that they can sell the work. When I was selling on the street, I continually heard, "maybe if you changed your style you would sell better". Commercializing definitely is popular. Or what about gallery directors coming to your studio and picking out what they like or making suggestions for what they'd like you to paint next. In the end, I guess it's the same, whether it's words or paint, someone is always wanting to change your ideas or tell you what is good for the market. Hey, maybe there is something of value in their suggestions. You just have to hear them out and then decide. Since each experience is different, you have to always be open for that surprise. For me, I continue to paint what I want and hope someone out there digs it!

 
At 5:12 PM , Blogger Eben Reilly said...

randi--

Yes, it's an interesting distinction. In the world of publishing editors/agents make "suggestions" based on which we revise. In the visual arts,
galleries have specific ideas in terms of what they choose to "show and sell"; however, it's up to the artist who wants representaton
to find the right match or take implicit cues to edit his or her own work to attract or keep a gallery. Hmmmm....

 
At 7:38 PM , Anonymous ransilv said...

don't know how to do that blog stuff, so will put my comments in this email!!!

Yes, it's an interesting distinction. In the world of publishing editors/agents make "suggestions" based on which we revise. In the visual arts,
galleries have specific ideas in terms of what they choose to "show and sell"; however, it's up to the artist who wants representaton
to find the right match or take implicit cues to edit his or her own work to attract or keep a gallery. Hmmmm....

Yeah, just had that experience. Did some new work for a upcoming show, but it's look like the gallery director has a spefic idea on how she is curating this group show and wants to use some older paintings of mine instead. At least with writing, you still have the opportunity to keep working with your new material if asked to revise.
Gallery directors can definitely be like agents, they both love to make suggestions and participate in the creative process. And yes I agree, it's finding that right match, or at least someone who is flexible and is supportive of your creative ideas.
Did you ever think of doing a music video for the new book?

 

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